was in such a hurry to get the money into his pocket and run away. Of course he roused suspicion. And the whole thing came to a crash through one fool! Is it possible?" "That his hands trembled?" observed Zametov, "yes, that's quite possible. That I feel quite sure is possible. Sometimes one can't stand things." "Can't stand that?" "Why, could you stand it then? No, I couldn't. For the sake of a hundred roubles to face such a terrible experience! To go with false notes into a bank where it's their business to spot that sort of thing! No, I should not have the face to do it. Would you?" Raskolnikov had an intense desire again "to put his tongue out." Shivers kept running down his spine. "I should do it quite differently," Raskolnikov began. "This is how I would change the notes: I'd count the first thousand three or four times backwards and forwards, look at every note and then I'd set to the second thousand; I'd count that half way through and then hold some fifty rouble note to the light, then turn it, then hold it to the light again- to see whether it was a good one? 'I am afraid,' I would say. 'A relation of mine lost twenty-five roubles the other day through a false note,' and then I'd tell them the whole story. And after I began counting the third, 'no, excuse me,' I would say, 'I fancy I made a mistake in the seventh hundred in that second thousand, I am not sure.' And so I would give up the third thousand and go back to the second and so on to the end. And when I had finished, I'd pick out one from the fifth and one from the second thousand and take them again to the light and ask again 'change them, please,' and put the clerk into such a stew that he would not know how to get rid of me. When I'd finished and had gone out, I'd come back, 'No, excuse me,' and ask for some explanation. That's how I'd do it." "Foo, what terrible things you say!" said Zametov, laughing. "But all that is only talk. I dare say when it came to deeds you'd make a slip. I believe that even a practised, desperate man cannot always reckon on himself, much less you and I. To take an example near home- that old woman murdered in our district. The murderer seems to have been a desperate fellow, he risked everything in open daylight, was saved by a miracle- but his hands shook, too. He did not succeed in robbing the place, he' couldn't stand it. That was clear from the..." Raskolnikov seemed offended. "Clear? Why don't you catch him then?" he cried, maliciously gibing at Zametov. "Well, they will catch him." "Who? You? Do you suppose you could catch him? You've a tough job! A great point for you is whether a man is spending money or not. If he had no money and suddenly begins spending, he must be the man. So that any child can mislead you." "The fact is they always do that, though," answered Zametov. "A man will commit a clever murder at the risk of his life and then at once he goes drinking in a tavern. They are caught spending money, they are not all as cunning as you are. You wouldn't go to a tavern, of course?" Raskolnikov frowned and

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was in such a hurry to get the money into his pocket and run away. Of course he roused suspicion. And the whole thing came to a crash through one fool! Is it possible?" "That his hands trembled?" observed Zametov, "yes, that's quite possible. That I feel quite sure is possible. Sometimes one can't stand things." "Can't stand that?" "Why, could you stand it then? No, I couldn't. For the sake of a hundred roubles to face such a terrible experience! To go with false notes into a bank where it's their business to spot that sort of thing! No, I should not have the face to do it. Would you?" Raskolnikov had an intense desire again "to put his tongue out." Shivers kept running down his spine. "I should do it quite differently," Raskolnikov began. "This is how I would change the notes: I'd count the first thousand three or four times backwards and forwards, look at every note and then I'd set to the second thousand; I'd count that half way through and then hold some fifty rouble note to the light, then turn it, then hold it to the light again- to see whether it was a good one? 'I am afraid,' I would say. 'A relation of mine lost twenty-five roubles the other day through a false note,' and then I'd tell them the whole story. And after I began counting the third, 'no, excuse me,' I would say, 'I fancy I made a mistake in the seventh hundred in that second thousand, I am not sure.' And so I would give up the third thousand and go back to the second and so on to the end. And when I had finished, I'd pick out one from the fifth and one from the second thousand and take them again to the light and ask again 'change them, please,' and put the clerk into such a stew that he would not know how to get rid of me. When I'd finished and had gone out, I'd come back, 'No, excuse me,' and ask for some explanation. That's how I'd do it." "Foo, what terrible things you say!" said Zametov, laughing. "But all that is only talk. I dare say when it came to deeds you'd make a slip. I believe that even a practised, desperate man cannot always reckon on himself, much less you and I. To take an example near home- that old woman murdered in our district. The murderer seems to have been a desperate fellow, he risked everything in open daylight, was saved by a miracle- but his hands shook, too. He did not succeed in robbing the place, he' couldn't stand it. That was clear from the..." Raskolnikov seemed offended. "Clear? Why don't you catch him then?" he cried, maliciously gibing at Zametov. "Well, they will catch him." "Who? You? Do you suppose you could catch him? You've a tough job! A great point for you is whether a man is spending money or not. If he had no money and suddenly begins spending, he must be the man. So that any child can mislead you." "The fact is they always do that, though," answered Zametov. "A man will commit a clever murder at the risk of his life and then at once he goes drinking in a tavern. They are caught spending money, they are not all as cunning as you are. You wouldn't go to a tavern, of course?" Raskolnikov frowned and,2021欧洲杯买球官网was in such a hurry to get the money into his pocket and run away. Of course he roused suspicion. And the whole thing came to a crash through one fool! Is it possible?" "That his hands trembled?" observed Zametov, "yes, that's quite possible. That I feel quite sure is possible. Sometimes one can't stand things." "Can't stand that?" "Why, could you stand it then? No, I couldn't. For the sake of a hundred roubles to face such a terrible experience! To go with false notes into a bank where it's their business to spot that sort of thing! No, I should not have the face to do it. Would you?" Raskolnikov had an intense desire again "to put his tongue out." Shivers kept running down his spine. "I should do it quite differently," Raskolnikov began. "This is how I would change the notes: I'd count the first thousand three or four times backwards and forwards, look at every note and then I'd set to the second thousand; I'd count that half way through and then hold some fifty rouble note to the light, then turn it, then hold it to the light again- to see whether it was a good one? 'I am afraid,' I would say. 'A relation of mine lost twenty-five roubles the other day through a false note,' and then I'd tell them the whole story. And after I began counting the third, 'no, excuse me,' I would say, 'I fancy I made a mistake in the seventh hundred in that second thousand, I am not sure.' And so I would give up the third thousand and go back to the second and so on to the end. And when I had finished, I'd pick out one from the fifth and one from the second thousand and take them again to the light and ask again 'change them, please,' and put the clerk into such a stew that he would not know how to get rid of me. When I'd finished and had gone out, I'd come back, 'No, excuse me,' and ask for some explanation. That's how I'd do it." "Foo, what terrible things you say!" said Zametov, laughing. "But all that is only talk. I dare say when it came to deeds you'd make a slip. I believe that even a practised, desperate man cannot always reckon on himself, much less you and I. To take an example near home- that old woman murdered in our district. The murderer seems to have been a desperate fellow, he risked everything in open daylight, was saved by a miracle- but his hands shook, too. He did not succeed in robbing the place, he' couldn't stand it. That was clear from the..." Raskolnikov seemed offended. "Clear? Why don't you catch him then?" he cried, maliciously gibing at Zametov. "Well, they will catch him." "Who? You? Do you suppose you could catch him? You've a tough job! A great point for you is whether a man is spending money or not. If he had no money and suddenly begins spending, he must be the man. So that any child can mislead you." "The fact is they always do that, though," answered Zametov. "A man will commit a clever murder at the risk of his life and then at once he goes drinking in a tavern. They are caught spending money, they are not all as cunning as you are. You wouldn't go to a tavern, of course?" Raskolnikov frowned andwas in such a hurry to get the money into his pocket and run away. Of course he roused suspicion. And the whole thing came to a crash through one fool! Is it possible?" "That his hands trembled?" observed Zametov, "yes, that's quite possible. That I feel quite sure is possible. Sometimes one can't stand things." "Can't stand that?" "Why, could you stand it then? No, I couldn't. For the sake of a hundred roubles to face such a terrible experience! To go with false notes into a bank where it's their business to spot that sort of thing! No, I should not have the face to do it. Would you?" Raskolnikov had an intense desire again "to put his tongue out." Shivers kept running down his spine. "I should do it quite differently," Raskolnikov began. "This is how I would change the notes: I'd count the first thousand three or four times backwards and forwards, look at every note and then I'd set to the second thousand; I'd count that half way through and then hold some fifty rouble note to the light, then turn it, then hold it to the light again- to see whether it was a good one? 'I am afraid,' I would say. 'A relation of mine lost twenty-five roubles the other day through a false note,' and then I'd tell them the whole story. And after I began counting the third, 'no, excuse me,' I would say, 'I fancy I made a mistake in the seventh hundred in that second thousand, I am not sure.' And so I would give up the third thousand and go back to the second and so on to the end. And when I had finished, I'd pick out one from the fifth and one from the second thousand and take them again to the light and ask again 'change them, please,' and put the clerk into such a stew that he would not know how to get rid of me. When I'd finished and had gone out, I'd come back, 'No, excuse me,' and ask for some explanation. That's how I'd do it." "Foo, what terrible things you say!" said Zametov, laughing. "But all that is only talk. I dare say when it came to deeds you'd make a slip. I believe that even a practised, desperate man cannot always reckon on himself, much less you and I. To take an example near home- that old woman murdered in our district. The murderer seems to have been a desperate fellow, he risked everything in open daylight, was saved by a miracle- but his hands shook, too. He did not succeed in robbing the place, he' couldn't stand it. That was clear from the..." Raskolnikov seemed offended. "Clear? Why don't you catch him then?" he cried, maliciously gibing at Zametov. "Well, they will catch him." "Who? You? Do you suppose you could catch him? You've a tough job! A great point for you is whether a man is spending money or not. If he had no money and suddenly begins spending, he must be the man. So that any child can mislead you." "The fact is they always do that, though," answered Zametov. "A man will commit a clever murder at the risk of his life and then at once he goes drinking in a tavern. They are caught spending money, they are not all as cunning as you are. You wouldn't go to a tavern, of course?" Raskolnikov frowned and,was in such a hurry to get the money into his pocket and run away. Of course he roused suspicion. And the whole thing came to a crash through one fool! Is it possible?" "That his hands trembled?" observed Zametov, "yes, that's quite possible. That I feel quite sure is possible. Sometimes one can't stand things." "Can't stand that?" "Why, could you stand it then? No, I couldn't. For the sake of a hundred roubles to face such a terrible experience! To go with false notes into a bank where it's their business to spot that sort of thing! No, I should not have the face to do it. Would you?" Raskolnikov had an intense desire again "to put his tongue out." Shivers kept running down his spine. "I should do it quite differently," Raskolnikov began. "This is how I would change the notes: I'd count the first thousand three or four times backwards and forwards, look at every note and then I'd set to the second thousand; I'd count that half way through and then hold some fifty rouble note to the light, then turn it, then hold it to the light again- to see whether it was a good one? 'I am afraid,' I would say. 'A relation of mine lost twenty-five roubles the other day through a false note,' and then I'd tell them the whole story. And after I began counting the third, 'no, excuse me,' I would say, 'I fancy I made a mistake in the seventh hundred in that second thousand, I am not sure.' And so I would give up the third thousand and go back to the second and so on to the end. And when I had finished, I'd pick out one from the fifth and one from the second thousand and take them again to the light and ask again 'change them, please,' and put the clerk into such a stew that he would not know how to get rid of me. When I'd finished and had gone out, I'd come back, 'No, excuse me,' and ask for some explanation. That's how I'd do it." "Foo, what terrible things you say!" said Zametov, laughing. "But all that is only talk. I dare say when it came to deeds you'd make a slip. I believe that even a practised, desperate man cannot always reckon on himself, much less you and I. To take an example near home- that old woman murdered in our district. The murderer seems to have been a desperate fellow, he risked everything in open daylight, was saved by a miracle- but his hands shook, too. He did not succeed in robbing the place, he' couldn't stand it. That was clear from the..." Raskolnikov seemed offended. "Clear? Why don't you catch him then?" he cried, maliciously gibing at Zametov. "Well, they will catch him." "Who? You? Do you suppose you could catch him? You've a tough job! A great point for you is whether a man is spending money or not. If he had no money and suddenly begins spending, he must be the man. So that any child can mislead you." "The fact is they always do that, though," answered Zametov. "A man will commit a clever murder at the risk of his life and then at once he goes drinking in a tavern. They are caught spending money, they are not all as cunning as you are. You wouldn't go to a tavern, of course?" Raskolnikov frowned and,was in such a hurry to get the money into his pocket and run away. Of course he roused suspicion. And the whole thing came to a crash through one fool! Is it possible?" "That his hands trembled?" observed Zametov, "yes, that's quite possible. That I feel quite sure is possible. Sometimes one can't stand things." "Can't stand that?" "Why, could you stand it then? No, I couldn't. For the sake of a hundred roubles to face such a terrible experience! To go with false notes into a bank where it's their business to spot that sort of thing! No, I should not have the face to do it. Would you?" Raskolnikov had an intense desire again "to put his tongue out." Shivers kept running down his spine. "I should do it quite differently," Raskolnikov began. "This is how I would change the notes: I'd count the first thousand three or four times backwards and forwards, look at every note and then I'd set to the second thousand; I'd count that half way through and then hold some fifty rouble note to the light, then turn it, then hold it to the light again- to see whether it was a good one? 'I am afraid,' I would say. 'A relation of mine lost twenty-five roubles the other day through a false note,' and then I'd tell them the whole story. And after I began counting the third, 'no, excuse me,' I would say, 'I fancy I made a mistake in the seventh hundred in that second thousand, I am not sure.' And so I would give up the third thousand and go back to the second and so on to the end. And when I had finished, I'd pick out one from the fifth and one from the second thousand and take them again to the light and ask again 'change them, please,' and put the clerk into such a stew that he would not know how to get rid of me. When I'd finished and had gone out, I'd come back, 'No, excuse me,' and ask for some explanation. That's how I'd do it." "Foo, what terrible things you say!" said Zametov, laughing. "But all that is only talk. I dare say when it came to deeds you'd make a slip. I believe that even a practised, desperate man cannot always reckon on himself, much less you and I. To take an example near home- that old woman murdered in our district. The murderer seems to have been a desperate fellow, he risked everything in open daylight, was saved by a miracle- but his hands shook, too. He did not succeed in robbing the place, he' couldn't stand it. That was clear from the..." Raskolnikov seemed offended. "Clear? Why don't you catch him then?" he cried, maliciously gibing at Zametov. "Well, they will catch him." "Who? You? Do you suppose you could catch him? You've a tough job! A great point for you is whether a man is spending money or not. If he had no money and suddenly begins spending, he must be the man. So that any child can mislead you." "The fact is they always do that, though," answered Zametov. "A man will commit a clever murder at the risk of his life and then at once he goes drinking in a tavern. They are caught spending money, they are not all as cunning as you are. You wouldn't go to a tavern, of course?" Raskolnikov frowned and

was in such a hurry to get the money into his pocket and run away. Of course he roused suspicion. And the whole thing came to a crash through one fool! Is it possible?" "That his hands trembled?" observed Zametov, "yes, that's quite possible. That I feel quite sure is possible. Sometimes one can't stand things." "Can't stand that?" "Why, could you stand it then? No, I couldn't. For the sake of a hundred roubles to face such a terrible experience! To go with false notes into a bank where it's their business to spot that sort of thing! No, I should not have the face to do it. Would you?" Raskolnikov had an intense desire again "to put his tongue out." Shivers kept running down his spine. "I should do it quite differently," Raskolnikov began. "This is how I would change the notes: I'd count the first thousand three or four times backwards and forwards, look at every note and then I'd set to the second thousand; I'd count that half way through and then hold some fifty rouble note to the light, then turn it, then hold it to the light again- to see whether it was a good one? 'I am afraid,' I would say. 'A relation of mine lost twenty-five roubles the other day through a false note,' and then I'd tell them the whole story. And after I began counting the third, 'no, excuse me,' I would say, 'I fancy I made a mistake in the seventh hundred in that second thousand, I am not sure.' And so I would give up the third thousand and go back to the second and so on to the end. And when I had finished, I'd pick out one from the fifth and one from the second thousand and take them again to the light and ask again 'change them, please,' and put the clerk into such a stew that he would not know how to get rid of me. When I'd finished and had gone out, I'd come back, 'No, excuse me,' and ask for some explanation. That's how I'd do it." "Foo, what terrible things you say!" said Zametov, laughing. "But all that is only talk. I dare say when it came to deeds you'd make a slip. I believe that even a practised, desperate man cannot always reckon on himself, much less you and I. To take an example near home- that old woman murdered in our district. The murderer seems to have been a desperate fellow, he risked everything in open daylight, was saved by a miracle- but his hands shook, too. He did not succeed in robbing the place, he' couldn't stand it. That was clear from the..." Raskolnikov seemed offended. "Clear? Why don't you catch him then?" he cried, maliciously gibing at Zametov. "Well, they will catch him." "Who? You? Do you suppose you could catch him? You've a tough job! A great point for you is whether a man is spending money or not. If he had no money and suddenly begins spending, he must be the man. So that any child can mislead you." "The fact is they always do that, though," answered Zametov. "A man will commit a clever murder at the risk of his life and then at once he goes drinking in a tavern. They are caught spending money, they are not all as cunning as you are. You wouldn't go to a tavern, of course?" Raskolnikov frowned and,AG手机appwas in such a hurry to get the money into his pocket and run away. Of course he roused suspicion. And the whole thing came to a crash through one fool! Is it possible?" "That his hands trembled?" observed Zametov, "yes, that's quite possible. That I feel quite sure is possible. Sometimes one can't stand things." "Can't stand that?" "Why, could you stand it then? No, I couldn't. For the sake of a hundred roubles to face such a terrible experience! To go with false notes into a bank where it's their business to spot that sort of thing! No, I should not have the face to do it. Would you?" Raskolnikov had an intense desire again "to put his tongue out." Shivers kept running down his spine. "I should do it quite differently," Raskolnikov began. "This is how I would change the notes: I'd count the first thousand three or four times backwards and forwards, look at every note and then I'd set to the second thousand; I'd count that half way through and then hold some fifty rouble note to the light, then turn it, then hold it to the light again- to see whether it was a good one? 'I am afraid,' I would say. 'A relation of mine lost twenty-five roubles the other day through a false note,' and then I'd tell them the whole story. And after I began counting the third, 'no, excuse me,' I would say, 'I fancy I made a mistake in the seventh hundred in that second thousand, I am not sure.' And so I would give up the third thousand and go back to the second and so on to the end. And when I had finished, I'd pick out one from the fifth and one from the second thousand and take them again to the light and ask again 'change them, please,' and put the clerk into such a stew that he would not know how to get rid of me. When I'd finished and had gone out, I'd come back, 'No, excuse me,' and ask for some explanation. That's how I'd do it." "Foo, what terrible things you say!" said Zametov, laughing. "But all that is only talk. I dare say when it came to deeds you'd make a slip. I believe that even a practised, desperate man cannot always reckon on himself, much less you and I. To take an example near home- that old woman murdered in our district. The murderer seems to have been a desperate fellow, he risked everything in open daylight, was saved by a miracle- but his hands shook, too. He did not succeed in robbing the place, he' couldn't stand it. That was clear from the..." Raskolnikov seemed offended. "Clear? Why don't you catch him then?" he cried, maliciously gibing at Zametov. "Well, they will catch him." "Who? You? Do you suppose you could catch him? You've a tough job! A great point for you is whether a man is spending money or not. If he had no money and suddenly begins spending, he must be the man. So that any child can mislead you." "The fact is they always do that, though," answered Zametov. "A man will commit a clever murder at the risk of his life and then at once he goes drinking in a tavern. They are caught spending money, they are not all as cunning as you are. You wouldn't go to a tavern, of course?" Raskolnikov frowned and,was in such a hurry to get the money into his pocket and run away. Of course he roused suspicion. And the whole thing came to a crash through one fool! Is it possible?" "That his hands trembled?" observed Zametov, "yes, that's quite possible. That I feel quite sure is possible. Sometimes one can't stand things." "Can't stand that?" "Why, could you stand it then? No, I couldn't. For the sake of a hundred roubles to face such a terrible experience! To go with false notes into a bank where it's their business to spot that sort of thing! No, I should not have the face to do it. Would you?" Raskolnikov had an intense desire again "to put his tongue out." Shivers kept running down his spine. "I should do it quite differently," Raskolnikov began. "This is how I would change the notes: I'd count the first thousand three or four times backwards and forwards, look at every note and then I'd set to the second thousand; I'd count that half way through and then hold some fifty rouble note to the light, then turn it, then hold it to the light again- to see whether it was a good one? 'I am afraid,' I would say. 'A relation of mine lost twenty-five roubles the other day through a false note,' and then I'd tell them the whole story. And after I began counting the third, 'no, excuse me,' I would say, 'I fancy I made a mistake in the seventh hundred in that second thousand, I am not sure.' And so I would give up the third thousand and go back to the second and so on to the end. And when I had finished, I'd pick out one from the fifth and one from the second thousand and take them again to the light and ask again 'change them, please,' and put the clerk into such a stew that he would not know how to get rid of me. When I'd finished and had gone out, I'd come back, 'No, excuse me,' and ask for some explanation. That's how I'd do it." "Foo, what terrible things you say!" said Zametov, laughing. "But all that is only talk. I dare say when it came to deeds you'd make a slip. I believe that even a practised, desperate man cannot always reckon on himself, much less you and I. To take an example near home- that old woman murdered in our district. The murderer seems to have been a desperate fellow, he risked everything in open daylight, was saved by a miracle- but his hands shook, too. He did not succeed in robbing the place, he' couldn't stand it. That was clear from the..." Raskolnikov seemed offended. "Clear? Why don't you catch him then?" he cried, maliciously gibing at Zametov. "Well, they will catch him." "Who? You? Do you suppose you could catch him? You've a tough job! A great point for you is whether a man is spending money or not. If he had no money and suddenly begins spending, he must be the man. So that any child can mislead you." "The fact is they always do that, though," answered Zametov. "A man will commit a clever murder at the risk of his life and then at once he goes drinking in a tavern. They are caught spending money, they are not all as cunning as you are. You wouldn't go to a tavern, of course?" Raskolnikov frowned and2021欧洲杯买球正规平台

was in such a hurry to get the money into his pocket and run away. Of course he roused suspicion. And the whole thing came to a crash through one fool! Is it possible?" "That his hands trembled?" observed Zametov, "yes, that's quite possible. That I feel quite sure is possible. Sometimes one can't stand things." "Can't stand that?" "Why, could you stand it then? No, I couldn't. For the sake of a hundred roubles to face such a terrible experience! To go with false notes into a bank where it's their business to spot that sort of thing! No, I should not have the face to do it. Would you?" Raskolnikov had an intense desire again "to put his tongue out." Shivers kept running down his spine. "I should do it quite differently," Raskolnikov began. "This is how I would change the notes: I'd count the first thousand three or four times backwards and forwards, look at every note and then I'd set to the second thousand; I'd count that half way through and then hold some fifty rouble note to the light, then turn it, then hold it to the light again- to see whether it was a good one? 'I am afraid,' I would say. 'A relation of mine lost twenty-five roubles the other day through a false note,' and then I'd tell them the whole story. And after I began counting the third, 'no, excuse me,' I would say, 'I fancy I made a mistake in the seventh hundred in that second thousand, I am not sure.' And so I would give up the third thousand and go back to the second and so on to the end. And when I had finished, I'd pick out one from the fifth and one from the second thousand and take them again to the light and ask again 'change them, please,' and put the clerk into such a stew that he would not know how to get rid of me. When I'd finished and had gone out, I'd come back, 'No, excuse me,' and ask for some explanation. That's how I'd do it." "Foo, what terrible things you say!" said Zametov, laughing. "But all that is only talk. I dare say when it came to deeds you'd make a slip. I believe that even a practised, desperate man cannot always reckon on himself, much less you and I. To take an example near home- that old woman murdered in our district. The murderer seems to have been a desperate fellow, he risked everything in open daylight, was saved by a miracle- but his hands shook, too. He did not succeed in robbing the place, he' couldn't stand it. That was clear from the..." Raskolnikov seemed offended. "Clear? Why don't you catch him then?" he cried, maliciously gibing at Zametov. "Well, they will catch him." "Who? You? Do you suppose you could catch him? You've a tough job! A great point for you is whether a man is spending money or not. If he had no money and suddenly begins spending, he must be the man. So that any child can mislead you." "The fact is they always do that, though," answered Zametov. "A man will commit a clever murder at the risk of his life and then at once he goes drinking in a tavern. They are caught spending money, they are not all as cunning as you are. You wouldn't go to a tavern, of course?" Raskolnikov frowned and,AG手机appwas in such a hurry to get the money into his pocket and run away. Of course he roused suspicion. And the whole thing came to a crash through one fool! Is it possible?" "That his hands trembled?" observed Zametov, "yes, that's quite possible. That I feel quite sure is possible. Sometimes one can't stand things." "Can't stand that?" "Why, could you stand it then? No, I couldn't. For the sake of a hundred roubles to face such a terrible experience! To go with false notes into a bank where it's their business to spot that sort of thing! No, I should not have the face to do it. Would you?" Raskolnikov had an intense desire again "to put his tongue out." Shivers kept running down his spine. "I should do it quite differently," Raskolnikov began. "This is how I would change the notes: I'd count the first thousand three or four times backwards and forwards, look at every note and then I'd set to the second thousand; I'd count that half way through and then hold some fifty rouble note to the light, then turn it, then hold it to the light again- to see whether it was a good one? 'I am afraid,' I would say. 'A relation of mine lost twenty-five roubles the other day through a false note,' and then I'd tell them the whole story. And after I began counting the third, 'no, excuse me,' I would say, 'I fancy I made a mistake in the seventh hundred in that second thousand, I am not sure.' And so I would give up the third thousand and go back to the second and so on to the end. And when I had finished, I'd pick out one from the fifth and one from the second thousand and take them again to the light and ask again 'change them, please,' and put the clerk into such a stew that he would not know how to get rid of me. When I'd finished and had gone out, I'd come back, 'No, excuse me,' and ask for some explanation. That's how I'd do it." "Foo, what terrible things you say!" said Zametov, laughing. "But all that is only talk. I dare say when it came to deeds you'd make a slip. I believe that even a practised, desperate man cannot always reckon on himself, much less you and I. To take an example near home- that old woman murdered in our district. The murderer seems to have been a desperate fellow, he risked everything in open daylight, was saved by a miracle- but his hands shook, too. He did not succeed in robbing the place, he' couldn't stand it. That was clear from the..." Raskolnikov seemed offended. "Clear? Why don't you catch him then?" he cried, maliciously gibing at Zametov. "Well, they will catch him." "Who? You? Do you suppose you could catch him? You've a tough job! A great point for you is whether a man is spending money or not. If he had no money and suddenly begins spending, he must be the man. So that any child can mislead you." "The fact is they always do that, though," answered Zametov. "A man will commit a clever murder at the risk of his life and then at once he goes drinking in a tavern. They are caught spending money, they are not all as cunning as you are. You wouldn't go to a tavern, of course?" Raskolnikov frowned and

was in such a hurry to get the money into his pocket and run away. Of course he roused suspicion. And the whole thing came to a crash through one fool! Is it possible?" "That his hands trembled?" observed Zametov, "yes, that's quite possible. That I feel quite sure is possible. Sometimes one can't stand things." "Can't stand that?" "Why, could you stand it then? No, I couldn't. For the sake of a hundred roubles to face such a terrible experience! To go with false notes into a bank where it's their business to spot that sort of thing! No, I should not have the face to do it. Would you?" Raskolnikov had an intense desire again "to put his tongue out." Shivers kept running down his spine. "I should do it quite differently," Raskolnikov began. "This is how I would change the notes: I'd count the first thousand three or four times backwards and forwards, look at every note and then I'd set to the second thousand; I'd count that half way through and then hold some fifty rouble note to the light, then turn it, then hold it to the light again- to see whether it was a good one? 'I am afraid,' I would say. 'A relation of mine lost twenty-five roubles the other day through a false note,' and then I'd tell them the whole story. And after I began counting the third, 'no, excuse me,' I would say, 'I fancy I made a mistake in the seventh hundred in that second thousand, I am not sure.' And so I would give up the third thousand and go back to the second and so on to the end. And when I had finished, I'd pick out one from the fifth and one from the second thousand and take them again to the light and ask again 'change them, please,' and put the clerk into such a stew that he would not know how to get rid of me. When I'd finished and had gone out, I'd come back, 'No, excuse me,' and ask for some explanation. That's how I'd do it." "Foo, what terrible things you say!" said Zametov, laughing. "But all that is only talk. I dare say when it came to deeds you'd make a slip. I believe that even a practised, desperate man cannot always reckon on himself, much less you and I. To take an example near home- that old woman murdered in our district. The murderer seems to have been a desperate fellow, he risked everything in open daylight, was saved by a miracle- but his hands shook, too. He did not succeed in robbing the place, he' couldn't stand it. That was clear from the..." Raskolnikov seemed offended. "Clear? Why don't you catch him then?" he cried, maliciously gibing at Zametov. "Well, they will catch him." "Who? You? Do you suppose you could catch him? You've a tough job! A great point for you is whether a man is spending money or not. If he had no money and suddenly begins spending, he must be the man. So that any child can mislead you." "The fact is they always do that, though," answered Zametov. "A man will commit a clever murder at the risk of his life and then at once he goes drinking in a tavern. They are caught spending money, they are not all as cunning as you are. You wouldn't go to a tavern, of course?" Raskolnikov frowned and,2021欧洲杯买球网站,2021欧洲杯在线投注was in such a hurry to get the money into his pocket and run away. Of course he roused suspicion. And the whole thing came to a crash through one fool! Is it possible?" "That his hands trembled?" observed Zametov, "yes, that's quite possible. That I feel quite sure is possible. Sometimes one can't stand things." "Can't stand that?" "Why, could you stand it then? No, I couldn't. For the sake of a hundred roubles to face such a terrible experience! To go with false notes into a bank where it's their business to spot that sort of thing! No, I should not have the face to do it. Would you?" Raskolnikov had an intense desire again "to put his tongue out." Shivers kept running down his spine. "I should do it quite differently," Raskolnikov began. "This is how I would change the notes: I'd count the first thousand three or four times backwards and forwards, look at every note and then I'd set to the second thousand; I'd count that half way through and then hold some fifty rouble note to the light, then turn it, then hold it to the light again- to see whether it was a good one? 'I am afraid,' I would say. 'A relation of mine lost twenty-five roubles the other day through a false note,' and then I'd tell them the whole story. And after I began counting the third, 'no, excuse me,' I would say, 'I fancy I made a mistake in the seventh hundred in that second thousand, I am not sure.' And so I would give up the third thousand and go back to the second and so on to the end. And when I had finished, I'd pick out one from the fifth and one from the second thousand and take them again to the light and ask again 'change them, please,' and put the clerk into such a stew that he would not know how to get rid of me. When I'd finished and had gone out, I'd come back, 'No, excuse me,' and ask for some explanation. That's how I'd do it." "Foo, what terrible things you say!" said Zametov, laughing. "But all that is only talk. I dare say when it came to deeds you'd make a slip. I believe that even a practised, desperate man cannot always reckon on himself, much less you and I. To take an example near home- that old woman murdered in our district. The murderer seems to have been a desperate fellow, he risked everything in open daylight, was saved by a miracle- but his hands shook, too. He did not succeed in robbing the place, he' couldn't stand it. That was clear from the..." Raskolnikov seemed offended. "Clear? Why don't you catch him then?" he cried, maliciously gibing at Zametov. "Well, they will catch him." "Who? You? Do you suppose you could catch him? You've a tough job! A great point for you is whether a man is spending money or not. If he had no money and suddenly begins spending, he must be the man. So that any child can mislead you." "The fact is they always do that, though," answered Zametov. "A man will commit a clever murder at the risk of his life and then at once he goes drinking in a tavern. They are caught spending money, they are not all as cunning as you are. You wouldn't go to a tavern, of course?" Raskolnikov frowned and

was in such a hurry to get the money into his pocket and run away. Of course he roused suspicion. And the whole thing came to a crash through one fool! Is it possible?" "That his hands trembled?" observed Zametov, "yes, that's quite possible. That I feel quite sure is possible. Sometimes one can't stand things." "Can't stand that?" "Why, could you stand it then? No, I couldn't. For the sake of a hundred roubles to face such a terrible experience! To go with false notes into a bank where it's their business to spot that sort of thing! No, I should not have the face to do it. Would you?" Raskolnikov had an intense desire again "to put his tongue out." Shivers kept running down his spine. "I should do it quite differently," Raskolnikov began. "This is how I would change the notes: I'd count the first thousand three or four times backwards and forwards, look at every note and then I'd set to the second thousand; I'd count that half way through and then hold some fifty rouble note to the light, then turn it, then hold it to the light again- to see whether it was a good one? 'I am afraid,' I would say. 'A relation of mine lost twenty-five roubles the other day through a false note,' and then I'd tell them the whole story. And after I began counting the third, 'no, excuse me,' I would say, 'I fancy I made a mistake in the seventh hundred in that second thousand, I am not sure.' And so I would give up the third thousand and go back to the second and so on to the end. And when I had finished, I'd pick out one from the fifth and one from the second thousand and take them again to the light and ask again 'change them, please,' and put the clerk into such a stew that he would not know how to get rid of me. When I'd finished and had gone out, I'd come back, 'No, excuse me,' and ask for some explanation. That's how I'd do it." "Foo, what terrible things you say!" said Zametov, laughing. "But all that is only talk. I dare say when it came to deeds you'd make a slip. I believe that even a practised, desperate man cannot always reckon on himself, much less you and I. To take an example near home- that old woman murdered in our district. The murderer seems to have been a desperate fellow, he risked everything in open daylight, was saved by a miracle- but his hands shook, too. He did not succeed in robbing the place, he' couldn't stand it. That was clear from the..." Raskolnikov seemed offended. "Clear? Why don't you catch him then?" he cried, maliciously gibing at Zametov. "Well, they will catch him." "Who? You? Do you suppose you could catch him? You've a tough job! A great point for you is whether a man is spending money or not. If he had no money and suddenly begins spending, he must be the man. So that any child can mislead you." "The fact is they always do that, though," answered Zametov. "A man will commit a clever murder at the risk of his life and then at once he goes drinking in a tavern. They are caught spending money, they are not all as cunning as you are. You wouldn't go to a tavern, of course?" Raskolnikov frowned and,2021欧洲杯在线投注was in such a hurry to get the money into his pocket and run away. Of course he roused suspicion. And the whole thing came to a crash through one fool! Is it possible?" "That his hands trembled?" observed Zametov, "yes, that's quite possible. That I feel quite sure is possible. Sometimes one can't stand things." "Can't stand that?" "Why, could you stand it then? No, I couldn't. For the sake of a hundred roubles to face such a terrible experience! To go with false notes into a bank where it's their business to spot that sort of thing! No, I should not have the face to do it. Would you?" Raskolnikov had an intense desire again "to put his tongue out." Shivers kept running down his spine. "I should do it quite differently," Raskolnikov began. "This is how I would change the notes: I'd count the first thousand three or four times backwards and forwards, look at every note and then I'd set to the second thousand; I'd count that half way through and then hold some fifty rouble note to the light, then turn it, then hold it to the light again- to see whether it was a good one? 'I am afraid,' I would say. 'A relation of mine lost twenty-five roubles the other day through a false note,' and then I'd tell them the whole story. And after I began counting the third, 'no, excuse me,' I would say, 'I fancy I made a mistake in the seventh hundred in that second thousand, I am not sure.' And so I would give up the third thousand and go back to the second and so on to the end. And when I had finished, I'd pick out one from the fifth and one from the second thousand and take them again to the light and ask again 'change them, please,' and put the clerk into such a stew that he would not know how to get rid of me. When I'd finished and had gone out, I'd come back, 'No, excuse me,' and ask for some explanation. That's how I'd do it." "Foo, what terrible things you say!" said Zametov, laughing. "But all that is only talk. I dare say when it came to deeds you'd make a slip. I believe that even a practised, desperate man cannot always reckon on himself, much less you and I. To take an example near home- that old woman murdered in our district. The murderer seems to have been a desperate fellow, he risked everything in open daylight, was saved by a miracle- but his hands shook, too. He did not succeed in robbing the place, he' couldn't stand it. That was clear from the..." Raskolnikov seemed offended. "Clear? Why don't you catch him then?" he cried, maliciously gibing at Zametov. "Well, they will catch him." "Who? You? Do you suppose you could catch him? You've a tough job! A great point for you is whether a man is spending money or not. If he had no money and suddenly begins spending, he must be the man. So that any child can mislead you." "The fact is they always do that, though," answered Zametov. "A man will commit a clever murder at the risk of his life and then at once he goes drinking in a tavern. They are caught spending money, they are not all as cunning as you are. You wouldn't go to a tavern, of course?" Raskolnikov frowned and欧洲杯app下载,was in such a hurry to get the money into his pocket and run away. Of course he roused suspicion. And the whole thing came to a crash through one fool! Is it possible?" "That his hands trembled?" observed Zametov, "yes, that's quite possible. That I feel quite sure is possible. Sometimes one can't stand things." "Can't stand that?" "Why, could you stand it then? No, I couldn't. For the sake of a hundred roubles to face such a terrible experience! To go with false notes into a bank where it's their business to spot that sort of thing! No, I should not have the face to do it. Would you?" Raskolnikov had an intense desire again "to put his tongue out." Shivers kept running down his spine. "I should do it quite differently," Raskolnikov began. "This is how I would change the notes: I'd count the first thousand three or four times backwards and forwards, look at every note and then I'd set to the second thousand; I'd count that half way through and then hold some fifty rouble note to the light, then turn it, then hold it to the light again- to see whether it was a good one? 'I am afraid,' I would say. 'A relation of mine lost twenty-five roubles the other day through a false note,' and then I'd tell them the whole story. And after I began counting the third, 'no, excuse me,' I would say, 'I fancy I made a mistake in the seventh hundred in that second thousand, I am not sure.' And so I would give up the third thousand and go back to the second and so on to the end. And when I had finished, I'd pick out one from the fifth and one from the second thousand and take them again to the light and ask again 'change them, please,' and put the clerk into such a stew that he would not know how to get rid of me. When I'd finished and had gone out, I'd come back, 'No, excuse me,' and ask for some explanation. That's how I'd do it." "Foo, what terrible things you say!" said Zametov, laughing. "But all that is only talk. I dare say when it came to deeds you'd make a slip. I believe that even a practised, desperate man cannot always reckon on himself, much less you and I. To take an example near home- that old woman murdered in our district. The murderer seems to have been a desperate fellow, he risked everything in open daylight, was saved by a miracle- but his hands shook, too. He did not succeed in robbing the place, he' couldn't stand it. That was clear from the..." Raskolnikov seemed offended. "Clear? Why don't you catch him then?" he cried, maliciously gibing at Zametov. "Well, they will catch him." "Who? You? Do you suppose you could catch him? You've a tough job! A great point for you is whether a man is spending money or not. If he had no money and suddenly begins spending, he must be the man. So that any child can mislead you." "The fact is they always do that, though," answered Zametov. "A man will commit a clever murder at the risk of his life and then at once he goes drinking in a tavern. They are caught spending money, they are not all as cunning as you are. You wouldn't go to a tavern, of course?" Raskolnikov frowned and

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